AMERIKA: What’s Really Behind Trump’s “7 Countries” Ban?, Does He Want to Keep Out Muslims, Or the CIA’s Irregular Warriors? – By Scott Creighton

Source – stuartjeannebramhall.com

“…Lets forget for a second that the fake left is going ballistic over Trump’s banning of people supposedly from those countries (when he doesn’t actually mention them by name in his order) while they have been quiet as little church mice as their hero, ObamaGod, bombed every one of them… and more”:

What’s Really Behind Trump’s “7 Countries” Ban (which actually doesn’t mention those 7 countries)? Does He Want to Keep Out Muslims, Or the CIA’s Irregular Warriors? – By Scott Creighton

Why are CNN and other MSM outlets reporting President Trump’s “Protecting the Nation…” order as banning Muslims from entering the United States from 7 specific countries?

“The executive order bars all people hailing from Iraq, Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen — or at least 218 million people, based on 2015 data published by the World Bank — from entering the United States.” CNN

Trump’s order, Protecting The Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry Into the United States, does not mention those 7 specific nations. The only one it mentions is Syria. The full text of the order can be found at the link and at the end of this article as well.

The list of 7 comes from a reference made in the order. Specifically, it’s the title of Sec. 3 of his order: “Suspension of Issuance of Visas and Other Immigration Benefits to Nationals of Countries of Particular Concern”

The reference is to a previous bill passed in Feb. of 2016, under one President Barack H. Obama. That one was titled the “Visa Waiver Program Improvement and Terrorist Travel Prevention Act of 2015”. The “countries of particular concern” were spelled out in that law as: Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia, and Yemen. It is indeed the same countries.

Under the Act, travelers in the following categories are no longer eligible to travel or be admitted to the United States under the VWP:

  • Nationals of VWP countries who have been present in Iraq, Syria, or countries listed under specified designation lists (currently including Iran and Sudan) at any time on or after March 1, 2011 (with limited government/military exceptions).
  • Nationals of VWP countries who have been present in Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, at any time on or after March 1, 2011 (with limited government/military exceptions).

These restrictions do not apply to VWP travelers whose presence in Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia, or Yemen was to perform military service in the armed forces of a program country, or in order to carry out official duties as a full-time employee of the government of a program country. We recommend those who have traveled to the seven countries listed above for military/official purposes bring with them appropriate documentation when traveling through a U.S. port of entry.

The vast majority of VWP-eligible travelers will not be affected by the new Act. New countries may be added to this list at the discretion of the Secretary of Homeland Security.” Department of Homeland Security

The 2015 order placed restrictions on travel for people coming from those nations, just as Trump’s bill does. But no one protested outside airports when Obama signed it. No one filed legal cases against it. Not a peep from folks like CNN or Rachel Maddow when Barack Obama set in motion the beginning of the bill that Trump is not being attacked for expanding.

Well I shouldn’t say it was the beginning of the bill because that dates back to the second Bush administration:

“We’re going to take out seven countries in 5 years, starting with Iraq, and then Syria, Lebanon, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and, finishing off, Iran” –General Wesley Clark

Switch out Lebannon with Yemen (due to the unexpected uprising against out puppet Saleh) and you have the exact same list. What a coincidence, right?

Anyway, lets forget for a second that the fake left is going ballistic over Trump’s banning of people supposedly from those countries (when he doesn’t actually mention them by name in his order) while they have been quiet as little church mice as their hero, ObamaGod, bombed every one of them… and more.

Let’s also forget about them calling Trump a Nazi for keeping some family from getting off an airplane in New York after saying nothing as President Peace Prize spent 8 long years calling in drone strikes on Terror Tuesday, killing scores of families across the Middle East.

And let’s not say a thing about how they weep for some director who cant attend the Oscars because of Trump while they actually applaud the work of the White Helmets, a group put together to spin up propaganda about Obama’s terrorists (al Qaeda by the way) in Syria.

Lets forget all of that because if we focus on that kind of stuff, it almost makes it seem like it isn’t worth trying to save this goddamned country…

And lets focus instead on what is really behind this temporary ban of Trump’s. Who is he really trying to keep out? Muslims or … something else?

If you consider Trump’s “Protecting the Nation..” order to be an expansion of Obama’s “Visa Waver Program…” bill then we have to take a look at the desired effect of each and see how they differ if we want to try to understand what Trump (and Obama) were doing with each of them.

Think back to last week when the likes of Keith Olbermann were screeching all of a sudden about how “crazy” Trump had to be removed from office IMMEDIATELY! Why was he and the others doing that right at that time?

Trump was talking about signing an executive order to begin a full investigation into the election results from a couple states, one of which was California.

That sent the fake left into panic mode. Why? Because Hillary “won” California by something like 4 million votes, when it was all said and done. And those 4 million extra votes provided her and her minions with the fodder to claim she actually won the popular vote in the country. She didn’t. California also rigged the unDemocratic Party primary election if you recall and almost all of those extra 4 votes in Cali for Killary in the general election came well after Nov. 8th. They simply padded the numbers for her, knowing she had lost, but hoping they could muddy the waters enough with that 2.8 million vote lead they fabricated to push the various efforts they pushed after the election and before the Dec. 18th deadline… all in an effort to install Hillary.

Trump’s order to start the investigation was a threat. It’s that simple. He backed off of it and as far as I know, he hasn’t brought it up again, but it was a threat and it was one that the corporate left took very seriously.

As bad as the fake Dems are right now, as bad a shape as they are in, can you imagine where they would be were folks to get a better look at just how incredibly corrupt they really are? And that is too say nothing of the damage an investigation would do to their “stability enforcing” e-voting machines trick.

I’m telling you that because I think there is a purpose to Trump’s “7 Country Muslim Ban” order that goes a little beyond “extreme vetting”

Take that line from Obama’s DHS FAQ page for the “Visa Waver Program..” law for instance. It gives you some keen insight into what the bill is really doing.

These restrictions do not apply to VWP travelers whose presence in Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia, or Yemen was to perform military service in the armed forces of a program country, or in order to carry out official duties as a full-time employee of the government of a program country.” DHS

What does that mean? That means if you were a hired gun for the Pentagon, CIA, State Department or anyone else, working in a “program country” ( one of those countries with a “regime change” program taking place) these restrictions do not apply to you.

These are all countries we had assets in and 6 of the 7 were targeted for regime change back in 2001, right? So his law simply doesn’t apply… to our terrorists.

Ah. An important distinction when you think about it.

Now, Let’s look at Trump’s order and see what it does:

“(c) To temporarily reduce investigative burdens on relevant agencies during the review period described in subsection (a) of this section, to ensure the proper review and maximum utilization of available resources for the screening of foreign nationals, and to ensure that adequate standards are established to prevent infiltration by foreign terrorists or criminals, pursuant to section 212(f) of the INA, 8 U.S.C. 1182(f), I hereby proclaim that the immigrant and nonimmigrant entry into the United States of aliens from countries referred to in section 217(a)(12) of the INA, 8 U.S.C. 1187(a)(12), would be detrimental to the interests of the United States, and I hereby suspend entry into the United States, as immigrants and nonimmigrants, of such persons for 90 days from the date of this order (excluding those foreign nationals traveling on diplomatic visas, North Atlantic Treaty Organization visas, C-2 visas for travel to the United Nations, and G-1, G-2, G-3, and G-4 visas).”

First of all, Trump doesn’t base his exceptions on the military and various agencies who hire contractors to work in “program countries”. He gives very specific details about who will be granted exceptions limited them to “foreign nationals traveling on diplomatic visas, North Atlantic Treaty Organization visas, C-2 visas for travel to the United Nations, and G-1, G-2, G-3, and G-4 visas”

Second of all, unlike Obama’s, his ban is not permanent, which is a key aspect to this. Trump is simply buying time to get a system in place, country by country, by which our immigration services can carefully vet anyone who comes into the country… regardless of their prior military service in “program countries”

The only permanent bans of nationals from specific countries that exists in his order would be those from countries who flat out refuse to provide specific, detailed information on their nationals who wish to gain entry into the country.

“(e) After the 60-day period described in subsection (d) of this section expires, the Secretary of Homeland Security, in consultation with the Secretary of State, shall submit to the President a list of countries recommended for inclusion on a Presidential proclamation that would prohibit the entry of foreign nationals (excluding those foreign nationals traveling on diplomatic visas, North Atlantic Treaty Organization visas, C-2 visas for travel to the United Nations, and G-1, G-2, G-3, and G-4 visas) from countries that do not provide the information requested pursuant to subsection (d) of this section until compliance occurs.”

This is an important clause because, I believe, it goes to the heart of what this is all about.

We own many nations. And when I say “we” what I mean too say is “the CIA, IMF, World Bank, Bank for International Settlements and the various other “national interests” our lying politicians serve.

And in those nations we own, we usually install various “intelligence” agencies and death squads and the like, who are always more than willing to help out when called upon.

So it would not be difficult for them to ship someone over to help a destabilization program right here in the states, would it?

When Trump says he’s trying to protect US citizens from terrorist acts committed by people coming in from other nations, I think he means what he says.

I just don’t think he’s worried about “ISIS” sending them.

Who is Trump really at war with right now? Clintons? Yemen (though he did authorize a bombing the other day)? Russia?

No.

Trump is at war with the CIA and it’s the CIA who just happens to have cornered the import/export market on extremist terrorist contractors these days, right? They’re the ones who train them in Syria and Jordan and hire them from Saudia Arabia or Qatar and export them from places like Libya to Syria… right? They’ve been doing that for decades. It’s called irregular warfare. Look it up.

And right now, the CIA is hot for Mr. President. He insulted them. He wants to pull out of the Greater Kurdistan project. He and Theresa May at least pay lip service to ending the regime change program that has made so many well placed CIA executives very, very rich over the years.

It appears to me that it’s at least possible that Donald Trump understands this and understands that tensions will rise as he and his administration try to impose different restrictions on folks returning from “program countries” and so, until he can get an adequate system in place, he decided to cut off all of them… just to be sure.

That’s my guess anyway.

PROTECTING THE NATION FROM FOREIGN TERRORIST ENTRY INTO THE UNITED STATES
By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and laws of the United States of America, including the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), 8 U.S.C. 1101 et seq., and section 301 of title 3, United States Code, and to protect the American people from terrorist attacks by foreign nationals admitted to the United States, it is hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. Purpose. The visa-issuance process plays a crucial role in detecting individuals with terrorist ties and stopping them from entering the United States. Perhaps in no instance was that more apparent than the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, when State Department policy prevented consular officers from properly scrutinizing the visa applications of several of the 19 foreign nationals who went on to murder nearly 3,000 Americans. And while the visa-issuance process was reviewed and amended after the September 11 attacks to better detect would-be terrorists from receiving visas, these measures did not stop attacks by foreign nationals who were admitted to the United States.
Numerous foreign-born individuals have been convicted or implicated in terrorism-related crimes since September 11, 2001, including foreign nationals who entered the United States after receiving visitor, student, or employment visas, or who entered through the United States refugee resettlement program. Deteriorating conditions in certain countries due to war, strife, disaster, and civil unrest increase the likelihood that terrorists will use any means possible to enter the United States. The United States must be vigilant during the visa-issuance process to ensure that those approved for admission do not intend to harm Americans and that they have no ties to terrorism.
In order to protect Americans, the United States must ensure that those admitted to this country do not bear hostile attitudes toward it and its founding principles. The United States cannot, and should not, admit those who do not support the Constitution, or those who would place violent ideologies over American law. In addition, the United States should not admit those who engage in acts of bigotry or hatred (including “honor” killings, other forms of violence against women, or the persecution of those who practice religions different from their own) or those who would oppress Americans of any race, gender, or sexual orientation.
Sec. 2. Policy. It is the policy of the United States to protect its citizens from foreign nationals who intend to commit terrorist attacks in the United States; and to prevent the admission of foreign nationals who intend to exploit United States immigration laws for malevolent purposes.
Sec. 3. Suspension of Issuance of Visas and Other Immigration Benefits to Nationals of Countries of Particular Concern. (a) The Secretary of Homeland Security, in consultation with the Secretary of State and the Director of National Intelligence, shall immediately conduct a review to determine the information needed from any country to adjudicate any visa, admission, or other benefit under the INA (adjudications) in order to determine that the individual seeking the benefit is who the individual claims to be and is not a security or public-safety threat.
(b) The Secretary of Homeland Security, in consultation with the Secretary of State and the Director of National Intelligence, shall submit to the President a report on the results of the review described in subsection (a) of this section, including the Secretary of Homeland Security’s determination of the information needed for adjudications and a list of countries that do not provide adequate information, within 30 days of the date of this order. The Secretary of Homeland Security shall provide a copy of the report to the Secretary of State and the Director of National Intelligence.
(c) To temporarily reduce investigative burdens on relevant agencies during the review period described in subsection (a) of this section, to ensure the proper review and maximum utilization of available resources for the screening of foreign nationals, and to ensure that adequate standards are established to prevent infiltration by foreign terrorists or criminals, pursuant to section 212(f) of the INA, 8 U.S.C. 1182(f), I hereby proclaim that the immigrant and nonimmigrant entry into the United States of aliens from countries referred to in section 217(a)(12) of the INA, 8 U.S.C. 1187(a)(12), would be detrimental to the interests of the United States, and I hereby suspend entry into the United States, as immigrants and nonimmigrants, of such persons for 90 days from the date of this order (excluding those foreign nationals traveling on diplomatic visas, North Atlantic Treaty Organization visas, C-2 visas for travel to the United Nations, and G-1, G-2, G-3, and G-4 visas).
(d) Immediately upon receipt of the report described in subsection (b) of this section regarding the information needed for adjudications, the Secretary of State shall request all foreign governments that do not supply such information to start providing such information regarding their nationals within 60 days of notification.
(e) After the 60-day period described in subsection (d) of this section expires, the Secretary of Homeland Security, in consultation with the Secretary of State, shall submit to the President a list of countries recommended for inclusion on a Presidential proclamation that would prohibit the entry of foreign nationals (excluding those foreign nationals traveling on diplomatic visas, North Atlantic Treaty Organization visas, C-2 visas for travel to the United Nations, and G-1, G-2, G-3, and G-4 visas) from countries that do not provide the information requested pursuant to subsection (d) of this section until compliance occurs.
(f) At any point after submitting the list described in subsection (e) of this section, the Secretary of State or the Secretary of Homeland Security may submit to the President the names of any additional countries recommended for similar treatment.
(g) Notwithstanding a suspension pursuant to subsection (c) of this section or pursuant to a Presidential proclamation described in subsection (e) of this section, the Secretaries of State and Homeland Security may, on a case-by-case basis, and when in the national interest, issue visas or other immigration benefits to nationals of countries for which visas and benefits are otherwise blocked.
(h) The Secretaries of State and Homeland Security shall submit to the President a joint report on the progress in implementing this order within 30 days of the date of this order, a second report within 60 days of the date of this order, a third report within 90 days of the date of this order, and a fourth report within 120 days of the date of this order.
Sec. 4. Implementing Uniform Screening Standards for All Immigration Programs. (a) The Secretary of State, the Secretary of Homeland Security, the Director of National Intelligence, and the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation shall implement a program, as part of the adjudication process for immigration benefits, to identify individuals seeking to enter the United States on a fraudulent basis with the intent to cause harm, or who are at risk of causing harm subsequent to their admission. This program will include the development of a uniform screening standard and procedure, such as in-person interviews; a database of identity documents proffered by applicants to ensure that duplicate documents are not used by multiple applicants; amended application forms that include questions aimed at identifying fraudulent answers and malicious intent; a mechanism to ensure that the applicant is who the applicant claims to be; a process to evaluate the applicant’s likelihood of becoming a positively contributing member of society and the applicant’s ability to make contributions to the national interest; and a mechanism to assess whether or not the applicant has the intent to commit criminal or terrorist acts after entering the United States.
(b) The Secretary of Homeland Security, in conjunction with the Secretary of State, the Director of National Intelligence, and the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, shall submit to the President an initial report on the progress of this directive within 60 days of the date of this order, a second report within 100 days of the date of this order, and a third report within 200 days of the date of this order.
Sec. 5. Realignment of the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program for Fiscal Year 2017. (a) The Secretary of State shall suspend the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program (USRAP) for 120 days. During the 120-day period, the Secretary of State, in conjunction with the Secretary of Homeland Security and in consultation with the Director of National Intelligence, shall review the USRAP application and adjudication process to determine what additional procedures should be taken to ensure that those approved for refugee admission do not pose a threat to the security and welfare of the United States, and shall implement such additional procedures. Refugee applicants who are already in the USRAP process may be admitted upon the initiation and completion of these revised procedures. Upon the date that is 120 days after the date of this order, the Secretary of State shall resume USRAP admissions only for nationals of countries for which the Secretary of State, the Secretary of Homeland Security, and the Director of National Intelligence have jointly determined that such additional procedures are adequate to ensure the security and welfare of the United States.
(b) Upon the resumption of USRAP admissions, the Secretary of State, in consultation with the Secretary of Homeland Security, is further directed to make changes, to the extent permitted by law, to prioritize refugee claims made by individuals on the basis of religious-based persecution, provided that the religion of the individual is a minority religion in the individual’s country of nationality. Where necessary and appropriate, the Secretaries of State and Homeland Security shall recommend legislation to the President that would assist with such prioritization.
(c) Pursuant to section 212(f) of the INA, 8 U.S.C. 1182(f), I hereby proclaim that the entry of nationals of Syria as refugees is detrimental to the interests of the United States and thus suspend any such entry until such time as I have determined that sufficient changes have been made to the USRAP to ensure that admission of Syrian refugees is consistent with the national interest.
(d) Pursuant to section 212(f) of the INA, 8 U.S.C. 1182(f), I hereby proclaim that the entry of more than 50,000 refugees in fiscal year 2017 would be detrimental to the interests of the United States, and thus suspend any such entry until such time as I determine that additional admissions would be in the national interest.
(e) Notwithstanding the temporary suspension imposed pursuant to subsection (a) of this section, the Secretaries of State and Homeland Security may jointly determine to admit individuals to the United States as refugees on a case-by-case basis, in their discretion, but only so long as they determine that the admission of such individuals as refugees is in the national interest — including when the person is a religious minority in his country of nationality facing religious persecution, when admitting the person would enable the United States to conform its conduct to a preexisting international agreement, or when the person is already in transit and denying admission would cause undue hardship — and it would not pose a risk to the security or welfare of the United States.
(f) The Secretary of State shall submit to the President an initial report on the progress of the directive in subsection (b) of this section regarding prioritization of claims made by individuals on the basis of religious-based persecution within 100 days of the date of this order and shall submit a second report within 200 days of the date of this order.
(g) It is the policy of the executive branch that, to the extent permitted by law and as practicable, State and local jurisdictions be granted a role in the process of determining the placement or settlement in their jurisdictions of aliens eligible to be admitted to the United States as refugees. To that end, the Secretary of Homeland Security shall examine existing law to determine the extent to which, consistent with applicable law, State and local jurisdictions may have greater involvement in the process of determining the placement or resettlement of refugees in their jurisdictions, and shall devise a proposal to lawfully promote such involvement.
Sec. 6. Rescission of Exercise of Authority Relating to the Terrorism Grounds of Inadmissibility. The Secretaries of State and Homeland Security shall, in consultation with the Attorney General, consider rescinding the exercises of authority in section 212 of the INA, 8 U.S.C. 1182, relating to the terrorism grounds of inadmissibility, as well as any related implementing memoranda.
Sec. 7. Expedited Completion of the Biometric Entry-Exit Tracking System. (a) The Secretary of Homeland Security shall expedite the completion and implementation of a biometric entry-exit tracking system for all travelers to the United States, as recommended by the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States.
(b) The Secretary of Homeland Security shall submit to the President periodic reports on the progress of the directive contained in subsection (a) of this section. The initial report shall be submitted within 100 days of the date of this order, a second report shall be submitted within 200 days of the date of this order, and a third report shall be submitted within 365 days of the date of this order. Further, the Secretary shall submit a report every 180 days thereafter until the system is fully deployed and operational.
Sec. 8. Visa Interview Security. (a) The Secretary of State shall immediately suspend the Visa Interview Waiver Program and ensure compliance with section 222 of the INA, 8 U.S.C. 1222, which requires that all individuals seeking a nonimmigrant visa undergo an in-person interview, subject to specific statutory exceptions.
(b) To the extent permitted by law and subject to the availability of appropriations, the Secretary of State shall immediately expand the Consular Fellows Program, including by substantially increasing the number of Fellows, lengthening or making permanent the period of service, and making language training at the Foreign Service Institute available to Fellows for assignment to posts outside of their area of core linguistic ability, to ensure that non-immigrant visa-interview wait times are not unduly affected.
Sec. 9. Visa Validity Reciprocity. The Secretary of State shall review all nonimmigrant visa reciprocity agreements to ensure that they are, with respect to each visa classification, truly reciprocal insofar as practicable with respect to validity period and fees, as required by sections 221(c) and 281 of the INA, 8 U.S.C. 1201(c) and 1351, and other treatment. If a country does not treat United States nationals seeking nonimmigrant visas in a reciprocal manner, the Secretary of State shall adjust the visa validity period, fee schedule, or other treatment to match the treatment of United States nationals by the foreign country, to the extent practicable.
Sec. 10. Transparency and Data Collection. (a) To be more transparent with the American people, and to more effectively implement policies and practices that serve the national interest, the Secretary of Homeland Security, in consultation with the Attorney General, shall, consistent with applicable law and national security, collect and make publicly available within 180 days, and every 180 days thereafter:
(i) information regarding the number of foreign nationals in the United States who have been charged with terrorism-related offenses while in the United States; convicted of terrorism-related offenses while in the United States; or removed from the United States based on terrorism-related activity, affiliation, or material support to a terrorism-related organization, or any other national security reasons since the date of this order or the last reporting period, whichever is later;
(ii) information regarding the number of foreign nationals in the United States who have been radicalized after entry into the United States and engaged in terrorism-related acts, or who have provided material support to terrorism-related organizations in countries that pose a threat to the United States, since the date of this order or the last reporting period, whichever is later; and
(iii) information regarding the number and types of acts of gender-based violence against women, including honor killings, in the United States by foreign nationals, since the date of this order or the last reporting period, whichever is later; and
(iv) any other information relevant to public safety and security as determined by the Secretary of Homeland Security and the Attorney General, including information on the immigration status of foreign nationals charged with major offenses.
(b) The Secretary of State shall, within one year of the date of this order, provide a report on the estimated long-term costs of the USRAP at the Federal, State, and local levels.
Sec. 11. General Provisions. (a) Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:
(i) the authority granted by law to an executive department or agency, or the head thereof; or
(ii) the functions of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.
(b) This order shall be implemented consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations.
(c) This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.
DONALD J. TRUMP
THE WHITE HOUSE, January 27, 2017

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