William Randolph Hearst Paid Adolf Hitler $400,000 a Year in a Secret Deal According to Journalist George Seldes

Source – coat.ncf.ca

According to journalist George Seldes:

“. . . Hitler had the support of the most widely circulated magazine in history, ‘Readers Digest,’ as well as nineteen big-city newspapers and one of the three great American news agencies, the $220-million Hearst press empire.

“. . . William Randolph Hearst, Sr., . . . was the lord of all the press lords in the United States. The millions who read the Hearst newspapers and magazines and saw Hearst newsreels in the nation’s moviehouses had their minds poisoned by Hitler propaganda.

“It was . . . disclosed first to President Roosevelt (by Ambassador Dodd) almost on the day it happened, in September 1934, and it is detailed in the book ‘Ambassador Dodd’s Diary,’ published in 1941, and again in libel-proof documents on file in the courts of the state of New York. William E. Dodd, professor of history (at the University of Chicago), told me about the Hearst sell-out . . .

“According to Ambassador Dodd, Hearst came to take the waters at Bad Nauheim in September 1934, and Dodd somehow learned immediately that Hitler had sent two of his most trusted Nazi propagandists, Hanfstangel and Rosenberg, to ask Hearst how Nazism could present a better image in the United States. When Hearst went to Berlin later in the month, he was taken to see Hitler.”

Seldes reports that a $400,000 a year deal was struck between Hearst and Hitler, and signed by Doctor Joseph Goebbels, the Nazi propaganda minister. “Hearst,” continues Seldes, “completely changed the editorial policy of his nineteen daily newspapers the same month he got the money.”

In the court documents filed on behalf of Dan Gillmor, publisher of a magazine named “Friday,” in response to a lawsuit by Hearst, under item 61, he states: “Promptly after this said visit with Adolf Hitler and the making of said arrangements. . . said plaintiff, William Randolph Hearst, instructed all Hearst press correspondents in Germany, including those of INS (Hearst’s International News Service) to report happenings in Germany only in a friendly’ manner. All of such correspondents reporting happenings in Germany accurately and without friendliness, sympathy and bias for the actions of the then German government, were transferred elsewhere, discharged, or forced to resign. . . .”

In the late 1930s, Seldes recounts, when “several sedition indictments (were brought by) the Department of Justice . . . against a score or two of Americans, the defendants included an unusually large minority of newspaper men and women, most of them Hearst employees.” (2)

http://coat.ncf.ca/our_magazine/links/53/seldes.html

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