MIND GAMES: ‘The New Inquisition’, Irrational Rationalism and the Citadel of Science – By Robert Anton Wilson

Source – youtube.com

“…Just like the old inquisition attempted to destroy all examples of thought or action that did not comply with their religious dogma to the letter, mainstream scientists of today have become a new inquisition and have suppressed and often incarcerated eccentric thinkers…the point is, you can’t believe everything that you hear from the scientific establishment”

The New Inquisition – Irrational Rationalism and the Citadel of Science

In this book Robert A. Wilson drives home the point that the scientific “establishment” is prone to acting like religious fundamentalists when it comes to offbeat new ideas that don’t conform to accepted “laws” of science. Just like the old inquisition attempted to destroy all examples of thought or action that did not comply with their religious dogma to the letter, mainstream scientists of today have become a new inquisition and have suppressed and often incarcerated eccentric thinkers like Reich or Velikovsky. So the point is, you can’t believe everything that you hear from the scientific establishment, as “evidence” that is compiled to dispute offbeat theories often shows traces of simply conforming to preconceived notions. A common example is the “mass hallucination” excuse that is often trotted out to explain UFO sightings or religious visions that are witnessed by many people. Mainstream scientists may even compile “evidence” to justify the mass hallucination theory, which is not a theory at all but a reaction to an uncomfortable or unacceptable idea. Wilson asks us, which is harder to believe – UFO’s or mass hallucinations? If you’re open minded, you can see the gaps in the establishment’s reactions, without resorting to outlandish theories yourself.
Wilson manages to stay objective and open-minded through most of the book, though he shows tendencies of the worst conspiracy theorists by assuming that simply piling on examples of suppressed ideas actually proves the existence of an organized conspiracy against them. This fails, as does Wilson’s use of the vague term “Citadel” as the supposed cabal of mainstream scientists who have devoted their lives to stifle creative thinking. Of course there are specific examples of this, as Wilson convincingly demonstrates, but he fails to reveal an organized effort by “the enemy.” And as always, Wilson’s sarcastic, stream-of-consciousness writing style has a negative impact on his credibility, as does the very awkward final chapter of this book in which he attempts to wrap up many disconnected ideas into an overall philosophical theory.
If you approach this book with an open mind, you will definitely learn how to read what you get from the scientific community with a healthy skepticism, and will want to see more evidence before you believe everything you read. This can definitely help you become a freer thinker. But if you’re one of those folks who claim that Wilson’s books have changed your whole way of thinking, you’ve pretty much missed his point entirely.

 

http: http://www.youtube.com

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s